Why does grass grow naturally?

grass

Grasses are a family of plants that includes cereals, bamboo and the short green stuff that makes up garden lawns. They grow all across the world. But what is it about grasses that helps them to grow in so many different habitats?

Grasses have existed since the time of the dinosaurs. Since then, they have evolved into thousands of different species that can grow in all sorts of climates and habitats – from rainforests to deserts to mountains to marshes to swamps. Grasses are estimated to cover about one-fifth of the Earth’s surface and are a main source of food for a variety of animals and insects.

One of the reasons that grasses have existed for so long is that they grow from the bottom up. This means that they can keep growing after their leaf-tops have been cut, so they can be grazed by animals without being severely damaged.

Humans have lots of different uses for grasses: some are grown as crops to eat or feed to animals; some are used as building materials; others are grown to make parks and gardens look nice! Did you know that barley, wheat, oats, bamboo, rice, reeds, maize, millet and sugarcane are all types of grass?

Cereals are very important grasses because they form a main part of the human diet. They are a useful food because they contain vitamins, minerals, oils, fats, carbohydrate and protein. You can find out more about these nutrients in an earlier post I wrote about why you shouldn’t only eat bread.

Talking of bread, if you want to know how it was invented, you might like to check out this website about the history of bread-making.

16 thoughts on “Why does grass grow naturally?

  1. Lydia.H November 23, 2016 / 1:14 am

    I literally had no idea rice was a type of grass. I thought rice was it’s own individual category!

    Like

    • kturton December 1, 2016 / 7:34 pm

      I learned a lot about grasses by researching and writing this article. Who knew grasses were so interesting?!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. bingskee November 23, 2016 / 6:49 am

    it was amazing to learn for the first time (from a friend) that rice is a type of grass. 🙂

    this is very informative.

    Like

    • kturton December 1, 2016 / 7:35 pm

      I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I enjoyed researching this one 🙂

      Like

  3. ispityourvenom November 23, 2016 / 4:03 pm

    Praises to people like you who have taken interest on things that really matter!

    Like

    • kturton December 1, 2016 / 7:35 pm

      Thank you for reading the blog. I’m glad you enjoyed this post.

      Like

  4. Chikulumas November 24, 2016 / 9:13 am

    Well I’m glad I started this account there is so much to read and such simple and complicated things they all become so natural here with all the writers

    Like

    • kturton December 1, 2016 / 7:36 pm

      Thank you for your feedback. I enjoy writing this blog and doing the research to answer the children’s fantastic questions.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Charlotte Graham November 25, 2016 / 4:32 am

    Great post, reminding me why science is so entertaining to kids 🙂

    Like

    • kturton December 1, 2016 / 7:37 pm

      Thank you! I’m glad you enjoyed the post. It was a lot of fun to write. The children are a great source of inspiration and a reminder of why I became interested in science.

      Like

  6. Rownak C November 25, 2016 / 2:20 pm

    Haha, this was so weirdly informative!!

    Like

    • kturton December 1, 2016 / 7:38 pm

      Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed it!

      Like

  7. notfaulkner November 27, 2016 / 3:35 am

    IS Antarctic Hair Grass a species of grass? Also, this was a weirdly awesome read! Didn’t think grass could be so fascinating!

    Like

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